Mutant moths in Japan

Mutant moths in Japan

This is how Mothra started.

When the Earthquakes hit Japan and destroyed the Fukushima Nuclear power plant, people freaked out (in places they didn’t need to freak out) and expected to see a wave of horrid effects as beasts of monstrous size came from the depths to wage a war of vengeance upon the cities belonging to the humans that contaminated their seas. Or at least I was sort of watching for that. It turns out that it's not too far from what seems to actually be happening in the land of the rising sun.Lately scientists have started noticing butterflies and moths flitting about with some very noticeable mutations. Mutations to the legs, eyes, antennae, abdomens and so on, all as a direct result of the nuclear accident. While mutants were documented at being around 12 percent of the population when the study first went into effect, the numbers have now climbed to 18 percent when crossbred with healthy individuals not affected by the accident. The percentage of mutant offspring turned up to be around 34 percent being mutated to a degree, meaning the mutant genes are being passed along.

Scientists then wanted to find out how things were after a longer amount of time and rounded up more than 200 butterflies last September. Of the 200, 28 percent of the butterflies showed abnormalities and the rate of mutated offspring jumped to 52 percent. This suggested that second-generation butterflies may have seen more exposure to the radiation while in larval form  No sign of Godzilla or Rodin yet, and despite how much I would love to see Mothra come and save us all, I highly highly doubt it will come to pass, but an important understanding of the effects of radiation on an active local ecology is both frightening and fascinating.